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  • 11 Sep 2012
  • Digital Media
  • Retiring the Blog
As you may have already guessed - since the last blog post was in 2010, we haven't had a great deal of time or resources to maintain Media Talent Bank over the past few years. As such, we'll be retiring the blog. Although the archive will still remain active and the site will function as ever, this essentially means posting 'goodbye' at the top of the feed. The directory is still free to join, browse and contact talented folk, although newsletters and such like will not be sent out anymore. Which, I think, just leaves me to say good night, and good luck.

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  • 11 Sep 2012
  • Digital Media
  • Retiring the Blog
As you may have already guessed - since the last blog post was in 2010, we haven't had a great deal of time or resources to maintain Media Talent Bank over the past few years. As such, we'll be retiring the blog. Although the archive will still remain active and the site will function as ever, this essentially means posting 'goodbye' at the top of the feed. The directory is still free to join, browse and contact talented folk, although newsletters and such like will not be sent out anymore. Which, I think, just leaves me to say good night, and good luck.

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  • 11 Sep 2012
  • Digital Media
  • Retiring the Blog
As you may have already guessed - since the last blog post was in 2010, we haven't had a great deal of time or resources to maintain Media Talent Bank over the past few years. As such, we'll be retiring the blog. Although the archive will still remain active and the site will function as ever, this essentially means posting 'goodbye' at the top of the feed. The directory is still free to join, browse and contact talented folk, although newsletters and such like will not be sent out anymore. Which, I think, just leaves me to say good night, and good luck.

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  • 23 Dec 2010
  • Broadcasting
  • Thoughts about online copy

Thoughts about online copy

This blog post originally appeared on my personal blog a few weeks ago, but seems relevant to Media Talent Bank, so here's a repost:

Like many, I'm often sent a lot of links to websites. Sometimes people want me to promote or link to them, and sometimes I have to proof or 'sex up' the copy as part of my job.

But the problem I constantly find with a lot of online content is that - particularly that promoting council or funded projects - it tends to be a bit, well, crap.

I despair when trying to flick through half a dozen pages to try and work out what, why and how a project deserves attention. In many cases you can't because copy is often written for funders, not the audience. The copy may tick all the funding boxes of 'bigging up' those who put the money in and managed the project, whilst providing a light sprinkling of buzzwords in the opening paragraph. But does it explain succinctly to the target users what the project is, why they should care, or how they can get involved? More often than not, no.

In short, too much online copy is simply print copy with a hangover; a pointless bag of meaningless marketing jargon slapping users round the face.

The simple point for content developers and online copywriters is; stop and think why you want people to read this. Justify to yourself why each word needs to be there, because for users the Internet is a big place; it's all too easy to skim or navigate away from content if it's just hot air.

Without trying to come across as a condescending pillock, think:

  • Who is the audience?
  • Why should a user read it?
  • Will the user be enlightened, provoked into participating, or be provided with a clear route into an action?

Write for the audience; if it's European funding-based and needs to appeal to young trendy types, content has to speak their language, not that of corporate business-speak or jargon/acronym-heavy bureaucratic jargon.

Ultimately, jargon and technobabble forms walls. Yes, they're comforting to those who reside behind them, but they form a vast barrier to those outside it, often obscuring the good work that may be going on inside.

And on that vaguely meandering point, I think I'll tail off for no good reason.

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  • 17 Nov 2010
  • Digital Media
  • Links for 17th November 2010

Links for 17th November 2010

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